1901

Field day at Marie-Antoinette's Estate

Voir Field day at Marie-Antoinette's Estate
1923

Robert in front of the Petit Trianon

Voir Robert in front of the Petit Trianon
August 1934

Laurence Rozier at Versailles

Voir Laurence Rozier at Versailles
1947

Friends from Normandy visiting Versailles

Voir Friends from Normandy visiting Versailles
07.08.1949

Visit to Versailles, in front of the Fountain of Apollo

Voir Visit to Versailles, in front of the Fountain of Apollo
1950

Alain at the Arc de Triumph Grove

Voir Alain at the Arc de Triumph Grove
08.08.1953

Group visit

Voir Group visit
1955

Josette, a Scotsman and a Mexican in front of the Palace, 1955

Voir Josette, a Scotsman and a Mexican in front of the Palace, 1955
1962

Winter 1962, sliding on the Grand Canal

Voir Winter 1962, sliding on the Grand Canal
15.02.1964

Thierry Le Guillou on the carrousel in the park

Voir Thierry Le Guillou on the carrousel in the park
1965

Victor Urbain with his daughter Monique and his two grand-children

Voir Victor Urbain with his daughter Monique and his two grand-children
1969

Jo at the Palace of Versailles

Voir Jo at the Palace of Versailles
1970

Versailles 1970

Voir Versailles 1970
1970

Versailles 1970

Voir Versailles 1970
1979

Carrousel in the gardens

Voir Carrousel in the gardens
1985

Tim 1985

Voir Tim 1985
December 2005

Angelo at the Petit Trianon

Voir Angelo at the Petit Trianon
2010

F & C – Palace of Versailles - 2010

Voir F & C – Palace of Versailles - 2010
July 2011

Waiting for the show

Voir Waiting for the show
Themes Fermer

A short history of family photography

Throughout the 19th...

The start of a collection

The connection between photography and the Palace of Versailles has...

Childhood at Versailles

For the residents of Versailles, childhood at the Palace of...

Visiting the Palace of Versailles in the 20th century

The first decades after the museum opened in 1837 did not meet with...

The history of the Palace of Versailles in the 20th century

The Palace of Versailles was opened to visitors in 1837 by decision of Louis-Philippe, who set up a museum dedicated...

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Visiting the Palace of Versailles in the 20th century

The first decades after the museum opened in 1837 did not meet with massive interest among visitors. It took Pierre de Nolhac between 1892 and 1920 to bring the old royal residence out of oblivion.

The first decades after the museum opened in 1837 did not meet with massive interest among visitors. It took Pierre de Nolhac between 1892 and 1920 to bring the old royal residence out of oblivion. His work on the Ancien Régime and the people who made and lived at Versailles aroused interest among the public who, little by little, discovered the history of the site above and beyond Louis-Philippe’s museum and the monument’s architecture.

Most visitors focused their visit to the Palace on the Grand Apartments, the Hall of Mirrors and the Royal Chapel, which give a full evocation of the memory of Louis XIV and Marie-Antoinette, the historical figures that visitors remember the most. Their fame goes beyond all borders and notably attracts foreign visitors, who have been the majority at Versailles since the 1960s.

 

Until 1920, the principle was for visits to be carried out under the mandatory guidance of a museum guard, paid by tips. The creation of an admission fee at national museums in 1922 made it possible to count the number of visitors. 230,000 people packed the Palace in 1923 and the one million visitor mark was systematically exceeded from the middle of the 1960s. In the 1970s this number exceeded two million, then three million in the following decade. Over seven million people now visit Versailles and its Estate every year. This constant increase has required new facilities to be able provide a worthy welcome to these visitors, such as the cafeteria installed in the Gabriel Wing starting in the 1950s, or the staircase in the same wing, built in 1985 following the 18th-century plans by the architect, Ange-Jacques Gabriel, making traffic more fluid, or the Dufour Pavilion, designed to be the Museum’s main entrance for the 21st century.

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